ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Ye, Guohui: Old Melodies 

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Old Melodies
  • Subtitle: 
  • Composer: 
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    9
  • Year of composition: 
    2014
  • First performance (year): 
    0
  • First performance (venue): 
  • First performance (performers): 
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    I’ve been always looking for the most persuasive score sample, which has been recognized and verified academically in the circle of traditional Chinese music score study.
    In 2013, my research made important progress in two aspects. First,I finally focus on The Wine-Puppet (Jiu Huzi), which was published in volume four of Music from the Tang Court edited by British musicologist Laurence Picken. I take The Wine-Puppet as a persuasive music score sample because the results from four different sources, which are Ko-fu/Hosho-fu ryokan (KF/HSFRK, 1201), Shinsen Sho-teki-fu (SSSTF, 1303), Jinchi-yoroku (JCYR, c.1171) and Sango-yoroku (SGYR, c.1171) respectively, come closely similar. Second, I accidentally found the Japanese gagaku performance video of The Wine-Puppet on the internet, and compared the video with the music score translated by Laurence Picken and the others. The result shows that, the translated music score of The Wine-Puppet shares the same origin with the Japanese gagaku video!
    The research and evidences so far gradually state the following information: The Wine-Puppet has been proved both theoretically and practically, to have the characteristics of Tang dynasty music and remain to the present. In another word, from the perspective of today’s concert, the sound, which is arranged, composed and performed based on The Wine-Puppet, would definitely share certain kinds of features in common with Tang dynasty music. And I also believe The Wine-Puppet doesn’t only exist in the form of music score, the other factors would also influence the performer’s mental or physical music text, including common patterns of form and relations between sound groups in all types of humankind music, differences in instruments, performance customs, tuning systems, environments, sound fields, etc. All elements mentioned above would float the music text on the edge of perception and distinction.
    Today, in the concert you will taste my work, a music experiment on The Wine-Puppet in contemporary view. I hope, from multiple perspectives, the experiment could more or less get the audience to perceive, listen, taste and experience the music from Tang dynasty!

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Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
19
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
1
Oboe
2
Clarinet
2
Saxophone
2
Bassoon
2
Trumpet
2
Trombone
2
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
2
Viola
1
Cello
1
Double Bass
2

 

 

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