ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Franceschini, Matteo: Middle eight 

 

 

Basic information

 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    MIDDLE EIGHT
    for six instruments
    The structure of modern and contemporary song-writing has followed an evolution in the last 50 years;
    however, it is clear how some of the “songs” we listen to today are still based on the same structure of the
    early Twentieth century’s songs.
    In its simplest form, the usual form of a song is generally characterized by a verse/chorus alternation, as
    well as by an “introduction” and a “coda” that act as a frame of the song itself. Very often, there’s a bridge
    between a verse and a chorus (the so-called “middle-eight” in the most classical 32-bars form) that
    constitutes a passage of a diverse harmonic as well as melodic nature, and often generates energy and
    impulse towards the conclusive chorus.
    Middle Eight presents itself as a personal reflection on the “historic” model of songwriting, aimed to find
    its deepest structures by investigating some of its gestural and perceptive archetypes. Working on a formal,
    precise and predefined scheme (AABACAABA), respecting its proportions and inner connections,
    necessarily establishes some limits and generates multiple questions. This close relationship with the form,
    familiar with the simple structure of a song, has represented an authentic inspiration in its dogmatism, a
    clear example of how a formal limitation can be used as a creative strength.
    The repetitiveness of the structure and the understanding of elements (i.e. melody, harmony and rhythm)
    that are put into play become the actual generating nucleus of the piece, its narrative beginning. The unity
    and homogeneity of gestures (that belong to a discourse of a “monadic” order) underline the idea of fluidity
    and melodic sequence. The different, shimmering, flexible and dynamic lines unravel thanks to articulated
    balances and by opening passages and cracks, and consequently by generating new but short episodes,
    desultory and imaginative breaks.

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Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
6
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
1
C
Clarinet
1
B-flat
MusiciansInstruments
Keyboard
1
Piano
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
2
Cello
1

 

 

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