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C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Cox, Boudewijn: Piano Concerto 

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Piano Concerto
  • Subtitle: 
  • Composer: 
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    18
  • Year of composition: 
    2012
  • First performance (year): 
    2012
  • First performance (venue): 
    Concertgebouw Brugge
  • First performance (performers): 
    Symfonierorkest Vlaanderen, conducted by Jan Latham Koenig
  • Publisher: 
  • Keywords: 
  • Solo Voice(s)/Instrument(s): 
  • Conductor: 
    Obligatory
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    This piano concerto is not a concerto in the classical sense of the word ( from latin concertare, compete ) . My musical ideas vary continuously and are being exchanged between orchestra and piano. The soloist does not seek a confrontation with the orchestra but is at several times part of it, together seeking unity of energy. (At this moment I'm definitely tired of all the polarizing attitudes in society. This is certainly an important reason why I decided to give my concerto this form, i.e. seeking unity of energy. It is high time that we all search for solutions to many problems in our society, that we look for cooperation and respect, and free our thoughts from the overriding profit). I hope this piano concerto proves that this could be a fascinating process.

    Although this composition is in one movement one can distinguish very clearly three parts; the orchestra starts with a hectic, nervous setting and the soloist joins this chaotic passage. After a while it becomes clear that the orchestra as well as the piano are trying to ease the nervousness and become more at rest. Then starts a meditative middle section. This middle section is the moment where energy is gathered and the whole gets a great unity and strength despite the predominantly soft dynamics . The third section starts energetic and straightforward, evolving in a powerful conclusion of the concerto.

    Conceptually, it is not so much a melodic concerto but there are certain techniques that always return. Like many composers I refer back to ancient techniques of composition, this time from the 14th century. I make use of so-called talea; I compose rhythmic structures that are varied through augmentation and diminution and are placed on the timeline of the composition on moments that I determine through the golden section proportions.

    It was my purpose to write a score that is as hallucinating as possible. (BC April 2012)

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Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
55
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
2
C
Piccolo
C
Oboe
2
Oboe
Oboe
Cor anglais
Clarinet
2
B-flat
B-flat
Bass
Saxophone
2
Bassoon
2
Bassoon
Bassoon
Horn (F)
2
Trumpet
2
C
C
Trombone
2
Alto
Bass
Tuba
1
MusiciansInstruments
Percussion
2
Glockenspiel
Vibraphone (F3)
Timpani
Harp
1
 
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
18
Viola
6
Cello
6
Double Bass
4
4-string
4-string

 

 

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