ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Costa, Simão: π_ANO PRE·CAU·TION PER·CU·SSION ON SHORT CIRCUIT 

 

 

Basic information

 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    "π_ANO PRE·CAU·TION PER·CU·SSION ON SHORT CIRCUIT" (fragment) on SoundCloud: Shhpuma Records

    ---

    YOU LISTEN WHAT I HEAR These are the words of the pianist: “You listen what I hear”, he says, because the microphones have been placed inside his head. You are the pianist’s ears! Imagine yourself sitting in front of the keyboard, as if you were the piano player, and listen. The small gestures, the intimate sounds of the performance, all the details, it’s you creating them. Now, even without moving from your seat, you can travel anywhere. Inside the pianist’s head, and beyond...

    Simão Costa

    ---

    Portuguese composer and pianist (also a researcher of the present day connections between art, science and technology) Simão Costa is a unique kind of fetichist. The object of his desire is the piano: you listen to his playing and it’s clear that he’s in love with its inner sound and the musical grammars developed in these three last centuries for the instrument invented by Bartolomeo Cristofori. All those intersected in “π_ANO PRE·CAU·TION PER·CU·SSION ON SHORT CIRCUIT”, coming from the classical tradition, the experimental explorations of the black-and-white keyboard or the strings inside, and also jazz and improvised music.

    But for him, like for any other fetichist, this is not enough: his imagination wants to bring the piano to its limits and beyond, even if this means a radical transfiguration of its nature and purposes. He uses computer electronics either for a radically different diffusion, and perception, of the sounds produced, and for their processing in real time, through granulation and synthesis. The result: sometimes simultaneously, a return to the most primal of all musical approaches, a percussive one, and the transformation of the piano into a sophisticated electro-acoustic device of the 21st century.

    John Cage-like preparations and the type of fluctuating non-linear phrases we heard in some of Morton Feldman’s compositions live together with repeated rhythmic syncopations, like if Thelonious Monk and Steve Reich were the same person, and with the kind of atmospheres that we imagine Brian Eno and Alvin Lucier could make together. All this is made with a clinical ear. We imagine Simão Costa in a dissecting (torture) table, opening human organs to discover what makes them tickle, while they tickle.

    Shhpuma Records

    ---

    Portuguese pianist/composer Simão Costa’s new CD explores the multiplicity of sounds available to a piano that has been prepared, electronically altered or supplemented, and even played in its native state.
    The unifying theme that emerges from the seven tracks collected here is the richness of the contrasts that bind and separate the muted, low-sustain sounds of the prepared piano on the one hand, and the ringing tones and harmonies of the instrument unmodified on the other. Putting the two in motion with and against each other is something Costa does effectively throughout the set. Often, the music will take on the character of a gamelan or detuned carillon nested within resonantly pedaled left hand figures. On top of it, Costa will frequently layer in the acute hum of feedback and droning electronics. These timbral experiments are largely cerebral in affect, but surprisingly beautiful impressionistic passages are liable to erupt unexpectedly, particularly on the fourth and sixth tracks. The last and longest track shifts attention away from contrasts in timbre and resonance and focuses instead on the possibilities of rhythmic variations within a pulse, its deliberately narrow range of pitches wrapped in the buzzing and rattling sounds of distressed metal.

    in: Avant Music News by Daniel Barbiero

  • Technical specs: 
    • 2 microphones for piano amplification;
    • Stereo PA if the room is big;
    • 1 monitor near the piano.

    Further electronic devices are a responsibility of the artist.

    4 balanced audio channels are coming from the piano to the PA (plus the 2 microphones described above).

Share

 

Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
1
MusiciansInstruments
Keyboard
1
Prepared piano

 

 

Content posted to the ISCM website reflects the viewpoint of individual submitters; its appearance herein does not imply official endorsement by the ISCM, its Executive Committee, or the Delegates to its General Assembly.