ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Byström, Britta: Der Vogel der Nacht 

 

 

Basic information

 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    DER VOGEL DER NACHT, programme note
    "Der Vogel der Nacht (The Bird of Night)", wrote Gustav Mahler in the original score
    to his Third Symphony, as a comment to a small oboe phrase in the fourth
    movement. The words come from a poem by Friedrich Hölderlin. In the completed
    score, Mahler changed the poetry for an instruction: "Wie ein Naturlaut". The little
    phrase, repeated like a sad signal, seems to comment the surrounding music. In an
    essay about Mahler's Third, the Swedish author Carl-Johan Malmberg compares it to
    Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven": a voice which keeps saying "Nevermore" to the
    longing human. This was the image I had in mind during the composition process.
    Distorted echoes of the little "signalphrase" create a kind of refrain between other,
    brighter parts in the piece - parts of "longing". In these, I have let the bells which
    accompany boy's and women's choirs in the fifth movement in Mahler's symphony
    wander into the piece, dressed in new notes. Mahler's post-horn solo and the long,
    hymnlike ending have also left traces in my composition. And one can find echoes of
    other birds than "the bird of night": the lonely singer transforms suddenly into a hole
    bird choir, chirping in dawn.
    "Der Vogel der Nacht" was first performed during the Baltic Sea Festival 2010, with
    the Swedish Radio Orchestra, Esa-Pekka Salonen. Since then, the piece has been
    performed by the Gürzenich Orchestra (Cologne), the Jena Philharmonie, the
    Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.
    Britta Byström

Share

 

Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
80
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
3
C
C
Oboe
2
Oboe
Oboe
Clarinet
3
B-flat
B-flat
Bassoon
2
Bassoon
Bassoon
Horn (F)
1
Trumpet
3
C
C
Trombone
3
Tenor
Tenor
MusiciansInstruments
Percussion
3
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
30
Viola
12
Cello
10
Double Bass
8
4-string
4-string

 

 

Content posted to the ISCM website reflects the viewpoint of individual submitters; its appearance herein does not imply official endorsement by the ISCM, its Executive Committee, or the Delegates to its General Assembly.