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C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Błażejczyk, Wojciech: Étude semi-concrète. Study for Many Strokes on Different Objects 

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Étude semi-concrète. Study for Many Strokes on Different Objects
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    11
  • Year of composition: 
    2019
  • First performance (year): 
    0
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    Wojciech Błażejczyk - Étude semi-concrète. Study for Many Strokes on Different Objects
    DESCRIPTION
    „Étude semi-concrète. Study for Many Strokes on Different Objects” is a half-composed,
    half-improvised piece for objectophones, electric guitar and electronics. The piece was
    commisioned by Polish Radio. It was written in tribute to Włodzimierz Kotoński, for a concert
    commemorating the 60th anniversary of the premiere of Kotoński's composition „Étude concrète
    (Study for One Cymbal Stroke), which was first polish electroacoustic composition. Unlike in the
    piece of Kotoński, many sound sources are used, and most of them are played and transformed live
    (that's why it is semi-concrete). But the idea is similar: composing music of sound objects, sound
    events, by trasnforming the original sound in various ways.
    Electric guitar is detuned to pitches: B – B – D# - F# - A – A#. Notes D# and F# are tuned in
    natural tuning (as harmonics, lower than in equal temperament). Contact microphone is attached to
    the head of the guitar, to amplify notes played on head part of strings, and bitones – notes plucked
    to the left of left hand, not to the right, as usual. In that way guitar is divided into two instruments,
    one tuned normally, another – microtonally. The piece can be performed with or without bass
    guitar, which produce some more sound events.
    Objectophones are everyday objects, which sound is amplified using contact microphones
    and transformed live. I use them in my composed and improvised music. Thay are played as
    instruments, using bow, mallets, plectrum etc. Sound processing can be controlled using pedals. In
    this piece 4 objectophones are used: carton box (boxophone), egg cutter (eggophone), tinware
    (tinwarophone) and chimney cleaner made of thin rhodes (thin-rhodophone).
    Live electronics is prepared in MAX software. There is no score, because I perform the
    piece myself, but one could be made. The structure of the piece is precisely composed and each
    performance is close to each other, although there is much space for improvisation.
    Here is the link to the live video recording from the premiere performance:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOEwG9eihVY
    Here is another concert recording:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41huTeJN20o&t=320s

  • Technical specs: 

    Wojciech Błażejczyk -
    Étude semi-concrète. Study for Many Strokes on Different Objects
    The piece is for electric guitar and objectphones. Objectophones are everyday objects, which are
    amplified by contact microphones. I have my own contact microphones. It is necessary to ampllify
    electric guitar and line output from my audio interface (stereo). I will need stereo monitor speakers.
    I need 2 x 2 metres space.
    TECHNICAL RIDER
    – 2 x DI-Box for signal from computer (jack TRS)
    – stereo front speakers with subwoofer
    – 2 small monitor speakers (2 monitor lines)
    – 2 x dynamic microphone for electric guitar amplifier (+ 2 x XLR)
    – Guitar amplifier, the best choise is Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
    – stand for electric guitar
    – piece of tinware (eg. tin from the owen)
    – 4 microphone stands
    – 4 jack – jack cables (mono)
    – small table for laptop
    – power supply (5 sockets)

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